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Posts tagged social media.

By Michael Langman and the AR Team
Over the past month, UEFA’s EURO Tournament has been generating tons of buzz across the social web. Featuring some the world’s most celebrated and recognizable national teams, it’s easy to see why the EURO qualifies as the world’s second-biggest soccer. Yet heading into this week’s semifinal matches, the two favorites, Germany and Spain, presented an odd contrast. Spain, the reigning champions, had generated more conversation on Twitter than any other team, while Germany, one of the early favorites to win the tournament, had generated the least. 
On its surface, the lack of discussions surrounding the German side may seem strange. The Germans play a highly enjoyable brand of football, one that had led the tournament in scoring entering this week, and the team breezed through arguably the toughest competition to get to this point - they emerged from the so-called Group of Death, which featured well-regarded teams from the Netherlands and Portugal, without so much as a tie. 
The reason illustrates an important fact about social media, which is that a brand’s overall ability to drive conversation is deeply reliant on the popularity of its individual parts. Out of the top ten EURO 2012 players on Twitter, five of them play for the Spanish national team. Many of the players on the Spanish national team play for top clubs in the wildly popular Premier League, arguably the most famous soccer league in the world. By contrast, almost all of the German talent plays in the Bundesliga, an extremely competitive (but far less widely watched) league in Germany. 
The global popularity of the Premier League is largely responsible for the other reason Spain has created so much buzz: athlete marketing. Spanish midfielder Cesc Fabregas has graced the cover of GQ, defender Gerard Piqué is dating the global pop icon Shakira, and midfielder Xabi Alonso is a spokesman for Hugo Boss. In short, the Spanish national team is filled with international celebrities, while the German team is not.
So for all the attention paid to to the peaks and valleys of Twitter conversation during matches, the real work that goes into winning on social media happens before the big game. It’s about cultivating and leveraging the connections you already have. 

By Michael Langman and the AR Team

Over the past month, UEFA’s EURO Tournament has been generating tons of buzz across the social web. Featuring some the world’s most celebrated and recognizable national teams, it’s easy to see why the EURO qualifies as the world’s second-biggest soccer. Yet heading into this week’s semifinal matches, the two favorites, Germany and Spain, presented an odd contrast. Spain, the reigning champions, had generated more conversation on Twitter than any other team, while Germany, one of the early favorites to win the tournament, had generated the least. 

On its surface, the lack of discussions surrounding the German side may seem strange. The Germans play a highly enjoyable brand of football, one that had led the tournament in scoring entering this week, and the team breezed through arguably the toughest competition to get to this point - they emerged from the so-called Group of Death, which featured well-regarded teams from the Netherlands and Portugal, without so much as a tie. 

The reason illustrates an important fact about social media, which is that a brand’s overall ability to drive conversation is deeply reliant on the popularity of its individual parts. Out of the top ten EURO 2012 players on Twitter, five of them play for the Spanish national team. Many of the players on the Spanish national team play for top clubs in the wildly popular Premier League, arguably the most famous soccer league in the world. By contrast, almost all of the German talent plays in the Bundesliga, an extremely competitive (but far less widely watched) league in Germany. 

The global popularity of the Premier League is largely responsible for the other reason Spain has created so much buzz: athlete marketing. Spanish midfielder Cesc Fabregas has graced the cover of GQ, defender Gerard Piqué is dating the global pop icon Shakira, and midfielder Xabi Alonso is a spokesman for Hugo Boss. In short, the Spanish national team is filled with international celebrities, while the German team is not.

So for all the attention paid to to the peaks and valleys of Twitter conversation during matches, the real work that goes into winning on social media happens before the big game. It’s about cultivating and leveraging the connections you already have. 

For sports fans, the second screen isn’t just an enrichment of the TV-watching experience. It has become an integral part of it. 
Game Five of the 2012 NBA Finals generated 6.31 million social media comments, the third-highest total of the year, a number that in some sense confirms what other statistics have been demonstrating for a while; 83% of sports fans, for example, will check social media platforms while watching a game on television. With that level of participation and engagement, such a high volume of posts isn’t much of a surprise. What is surprising, however, is the breadth of conversations that appear to be taking place.
The best indication of this variety can be found in this infographic’s sentiment analysis. According to Bluefin’s data, most of the conversations taking place around Game Five were sentiment-neutral. Granted, sentiment analysis has a ways to go before it can be considered wholly reliable, as social media listening tools still have trouble parsing double meanings, detecting irony or sarcasm, etc.
But the vasty majority of the narratives that surround sporting events tend to have very clearly defined moral parameters, with big clear expanses of black and white: “Is Lebron going to be clutch tonight, or will he choke in the fourth quarter?” ; “Is Russell Westbrook helping the Thunder, or hurting them?” ; “Are the Miami Heat redeemed, or not?” As such, it’s almost shocking that more posts didn’t show more feelings.
There is plenty that one could take away from that big, grey middle ground, but there’s one thing that is unmistakably positive: social media is now integral to the sports-watching experience, and there will be plenty for franchises, athletes, and sports brands to talk about. 

For sports fans, the second screen isn’t just an enrichment of the TV-watching experience. It has become an integral part of it. 

Game Five of the 2012 NBA Finals generated 6.31 million social media comments, the third-highest total of the year, a number that in some sense confirms what other statistics have been demonstrating for a while; 83% of sports fans, for example, will check social media platforms while watching a game on television. With that level of participation and engagement, such a high volume of posts isn’t much of a surprise. What is surprising, however, is the breadth of conversations that appear to be taking place.

The best indication of this variety can be found in this infographic’s sentiment analysis. According to Bluefin’s data, most of the conversations taking place around Game Five were sentiment-neutral. Granted, sentiment analysis has a ways to go before it can be considered wholly reliable, as social media listening tools still have trouble parsing double meanings, detecting irony or sarcasm, etc.

But the vasty majority of the narratives that surround sporting events tend to have very clearly defined moral parameters, with big clear expanses of black and white: “Is Lebron going to be clutch tonight, or will he choke in the fourth quarter?” ; “Is Russell Westbrook helping the Thunder, or hurting them?” ; “Are the Miami Heat redeemed, or not?” As such, it’s almost shocking that more posts didn’t show more feelings.

There is plenty that one could take away from that big, grey middle ground, but there’s one thing that is unmistakably positive: social media is now integral to the sports-watching experience, and there will be plenty for franchises, athletes, and sports brands to talk about. 

Earlier this week, it was reported that digital ad spending by candidates in the 2012 presidential race was up 700% from 2008 levels. 
Today, comscore has a little gem about where some of the money goes, with the Romney campaign making a significant investment in social, most likely in an attempt to eat away at the overwhelming advantage that the Obama campaign currently enjoys in that space. 
Romney’s campaign clearly has the funds to make an investment of this size, but does he have the right strategy? We’ll know more in a couple of months. 

Earlier this week, it was reported that digital ad spending by candidates in the 2012 presidential race was up 700% from 2008 levels. 

Today, comscore has a little gem about where some of the money goes, with the Romney campaign making a significant investment in social, most likely in an attempt to eat away at the overwhelming advantage that the Obama campaign currently enjoys in that space. 

Romney’s campaign clearly has the funds to make an investment of this size, but does he have the right strategy? We’ll know more in a couple of months. 

Nice to have something that dispels the notion that social is just for B2C. (via AllTwitter)

Nice to have something that dispels the notion that social is just for B2C. (via AllTwitter)

Klout’s competitors grow in number every day, but if they can keep lining up Perks, they’ll probably be able to fend them off.
(via pedroelrey)

Klout’s competitors grow in number every day, but if they can keep lining up Perks, they’ll probably be able to fend them off.

(via pedroelrey)

Social media might be the best place to look for jobs. Yet another reason the digital divide matters. 
(via Business Insider)

Social media might be the best place to look for jobs. Yet another reason the digital divide matters. 

(via Business Insider)

Steve Alford Wrong for Banning New Mexico Basketball Players From Twitter

By Matt Rudnitsky & The AR Team

Steve Alford, coach of the University of New Mexico men’s basketball team, has banned his players from having Twitter accounts.  We understand where he’s coming from, but this doesn’t seem fair to the players.

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Study Breaks Down Age, Ethnicity & Gender of Major Social Networks

By Caroline Nisenson & The AR Team

A recent study from the nonprofit and nonpartisan Pew Research Center examines how social and cultural identifiers factor into social networking within the United States.  In the study entitled Social Networking Sites And Our Lives, Pew Internet recorded the age, ethnicity and gender distributions of the major social networking platforms: Facebook, Myspace, Linkedin, and Twitter.  

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Moviemaking & Social Media Combine For New Hollywood Film

By Caroline Nisenson & The AR Team

 

We live in an age where the media is no longer one sided.  Since Facebook and Twitter exploded into a worldwide phenomenon, social media has become an integral part of society. Social interaction and information sharing are now crucial to the success of brands, as consumers not only prefer a two-way dialogue with the media…they expect it.  It’s not surprising then, that Hollywood has taken notice and hopped on the social media bandwagon.  In an effort to entertain the masses and connect with consumers, Intel and ad agency Periera & O’Dell are partnering with Toshiba and director D.J. Caruso to bring you Inside, an online horror flick powered by social media.

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MLB losing fans, needs to follow the NBA and embrace Social Media

By Matt Rudnitsky & The AR Team

Tuesday night’s MLB All-Star Game scored its lowest TV ratings in the game’s history, breaking last year’s record. This year’s NBA All-Star Game scored its highest ratings since Michael Jordan’s last appearance, up 37 percent from last year. And in general, MLB is losing popularity while the NBA is gaining it.

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